Deadlines

Deadlines are critical to working. Without one I let jobs slide for days, months, years. I have no deadline to fix my house and therefore I get little done on it but basic maintenance. The big jobs I am still considering. So too with furniture projects. Without a deadline, most of us let the idea simmer on a back burner for a good long while.

Our Mastery students have had this Thursday’s show date as their own deadline since beginning the program. Displayed this Thursday at the Studio from 5-8pm will be their Signature Pieces. This should be a great collection of work. The only stipulation put on their design was to have three drawers in it. It is always a great surprise to see what folks come up with. Please join us in celebrating their work and their accomplishment on hitting this deadline.

This Signature Piece was done by Brad Ewing for last year’s show. A knock-out Drafting Table. Please drop by to see the work of our graduating Mastery students. It promises to be another great show.

1-Brad Ewing Drafting Table 2

 

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Prodigies

Forget the 1 in a million prodigies. The rest of us strive every day just to be good. Forgive yourself your humanity & get on with your work. There’s so much to accomplish within ourselves in the process of building. This is the important work.

As my old friend Bogy said to me years ago, “You don’t make the work. The work makes you.”

1-Standing cabinet John RMP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Merrill, Resident Mastery Student, Graduate 2014

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Wood & Water

Don’t be afraid of wood & water. Wood loves the stuff. Most of the tree is water when it’s standing. It’s why they’re so heavy when they come down. It’s all that water inside of them.

Once I had a 1/2″ thick maple table top, 20″ square, all shaped and sanded. I decided to raise the grain and sand it off. Wet sanding I call it, although I wait for the water to dry and just sand off the fuzz raised up by it. Well I wet down this top and it cupped almost 3/8″. This is a very good way to increase your heart rate by the way. Seeing hours of hard work go wacky in a minute.

But I didn’t panic. I breathed deep, flipped the panel over, and wet down the other face. The table top came back to flat. As did my heart rate. If your wood gets wet, wet down the other side. It will be in balance. It’s imbalance that causes movement.

1-Lightning Bolt Table GR

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Practice

Getting back to the bench is as much elixir as it is simple nourishment. I spend most of every day working in the shop. When I want to relax, where do you think I want to go? To the bench of course. To work with my hands. To make something. To talk to myself perhaps above all. No matter. It’s practice.

Practice is what is needed to learn, to become proficient, to master. I worked next to a Japanese Living Treasure one year up at Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass, Colorado. He was a ceramic artist and spoke no English. His daughter was his helper, translator, and student. She would help him in class and she would practice her own craft. Every day, she would make the same pot and then crush it. Make it again, and then crush it. Over and over again. She worked every day to get the pot into her hands, into her bones so that in the end there was no thought required. It was a part of her like her breathing.

Musicians practice scales, ballplayers practice slides, craftspeople practice skills. Come join us at the Studio and learn new ones or practice the old. Either way you will enrich your life and get the craft into your bones1-Bedrock plane-002

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Create

Quit believing that you are not creative. Kurt Vonnegut said: “do art and do it for the rest of your lives”. If you stifle yourself you will fulfill your prophecy of silence. If you explore your life, your interests, the ideas and images that excite you, then you will unlock all sorts of unforeseen doors. Can’t know, won’t know, unless you try.

1-336

 

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Clean Up

Wait five or ten minutes to clean up your glue squeeze-out from a joint glue-up or lamination. It should be almost plastic and then it will peel right off. On a table top you can use a putty knife or my new discovery, an old chip breaker off a hand plane. It works great. For insides of boxes or cabinets, I use my sharpest chisel. That way if I cut into the wood, it will be a good clean cut. Also the color of the cut will match the wood inside which is always hand planed.

Patience is a virtue here. Let the glue skin over and almost set, but not quite. It will come off easily and there will be no smearing into cracks, corners or pores. This smeared glue will then only become visible when you put on finish.

 

Cafe chair rail detail Gary

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Your Grip

Avoid those teachers who say: This is the only way to do something. Whatever that something may be. That person has never been dancing. Expression is a part of building too. There are lots of ways of building things right. Just like there are several ways of learning. Learning style makes a difference in how well you understand a teacher. Pick a teacher who understands that not everyone is the same. Study with someone who remembers that choice is important too. It’s like a grip. They’re not all the same.

Brilliant chair au naturelBrilliant Chair Painted

 

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Getting Right

It is far easier to talk about than to do, but you have to get right in order to do good work. You have to think straight, to get your concentration right, to get your mind working with your hands and not against them. Now this can take hours for me some days before I finally get focused enough to work. But when I do then the work just flies and the time whizzes by and I get something done. It feels great.

But it’s a matter of concentration and when we enter the shop our mind is in a hundred different places. Where did I leave my keys? Did I send out that note? Where’s my dang hammer? Everything seems to thwart us at first. It can take time to get there and it can feel unproductive. But it is the only way to the productive place where all of you starts to work together and you start to do some good work. You have to get right first. Carved bird box

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The Work

Fine woodworking is not crafty. It is craft. It takes time, effort, and a commitment to excellence. It requires persistence and a willingness to overcome failure, repeatedly. It takes practice and patience and then more of both. It is as rigorous and as rewarding as learning a musical  instrument or teaching your body ballet or the tango. It is formal and full of expression. There are rules to follow and rules that bend. It is cumulative in its knowledge and yet so vast that no one can know all its possibilities.

You will not build anything well without throwing yourself all in. But if you, if you do commit to learning and getting it in your bones and doing your best, then the rewards are far greater than you imagine. As my friend Bogy once said to me, “The work makes you. You don’t make the work.”

Sideboard inlay GR

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A Neatness and Precision

In Pete Dexter’s book Deadwood, Wild Bill Hickok’s partner, Charley Utter, is thinking to himself, “He liked having a drawer, it was a neatness you could see just sliding it open.”

Making drawers requires a precision and calm missing from some other jobs around the shop. Cleaning out the dust collector comes to mind. Or hand planing some misbegotten wood like a rowed grain khaya. Drawer building on the other hand needs careful measuring, straight parts, and clear thinking to do a good job. A job that you’ll notice and admire in its careful sliding, with the slight woosh of air emerging as the drawer enters and fills its opening almost completely.

You can of course do a fast job and get it done with some drawer glides or run the drawer on a center mount. But it’s not the same. It doesn’t feel the same. It doesn’t act the same.

We’ll be busy at the end of this week in the Studio with a class on Drawer Work. We’ll be making a drawer box and filling it with one precision cut and fit drawer. When it’s right, you’ll be able to stand the drawer box on end and put the drawer in place and with a close piston fit the air will only let the drawer slowly descend into its resting place. Nice.

Walnut Collector's Chest open

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